Tuesday, December 11, 2007

78s fRom HeLL: Cousin Herb Henson - I've Never Heard (1954)

Other than the recording of 'Y'All Come' that would become his theme song, the handful of records recorded by
Cousin Herb Henson were mostly amiable country-western novelty tunes.
This goofy pair I've posted here are no exception.

Henson's more memorable achievements in the world of country music were as host of a TV show that did much to foster the growth of the artists responsible for the distinctive 'Bakersfield Sound' in the 1950's and '60's.

Cousin Herb Henson had been a radio DJ and sometime country music performer in Bakersfield, California since the latter-half of the 1940's when he was offered his own local TV show in 1953.

'The Cousin Herb Henson Trading Post TV Show' ran on weekday afternoons.
It showcased Bakersfield area musicians as well as a wide variety of guest stars, and the broadcast signal was strong enough to reach much of the Central Valley, Fresno, and out to the coast.

Cousin Herb hosted the show for ten years, up until his untimely death in 1963, at the age of 38.

- Read his entry at allmusic.Com

Listen to:
Cousin Herb Henson and His Trading Post Gang - I've Never Heard (Capitol 78, 1954)

(click for audio)













Listen to:
Cousin Herb Henson and His Trading Post Gang - Toto the Eskimo (Capitol 78, 1954)

(click for audio)



See also:
- Cousin Herb Henson article at
Bakersfield Sound


- Y'all Come -
A Tribute To Cousin Herb Henson


- Cousin Herb discography at
Hillbilly-Music.com

1 comment:

Margie Powell said...

Hi - I'm actually Cousin Herbie's cousin. He was 18 years older than I and used to come visit my parents when we lived in Compton, Ca. I would also visit his ranch in SanFernando Valley where he had many horses.

He came to visit one evening and I was already in Bed. I was about 11 at the time. I remember him waking me and all I could see was a big cowboy standing at the foot of my bed. He was the sweetest cowboy ever. I still think often of him with that big hat and boots.

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