Monday, September 22, 2008

Bill O'Malley cartoons from Extension Magazine (1946 - '47)

I found these cartoons in a few old copies of Extension Magazine, 'the Catholic Saturday Evening Post', that I came across recently.

(Click on images to ENLARGE in a new window)

Bill O'Malley was a prolific cartoonist, producing a lot of work for many American magazines from the 1940's through the 1960's.

I've seen several of the old paperbacks collecting
Bill O'Malley's 'Two Little Nuns' series of cartoons, but personally I don't recall seeing his more 'secular' work - - or even panels that didn't feature the nuns.

You can learn more and see a few more examples of O'Malley's artwork at Christopher Wheeler's Cartoon(ist) Gallery,
and another small example at Mike Gray, Pencil For Hire.




(For the puzzled, I'll venture this 1946 cartoon ▲ refers to leaving behind military service, post WWII)






























































































































- Again, for any who might be puzzled by the reference;
'Open the Door, Richard' was a popular R&B song (derived from an old vaudeville routine) first recorded by
Jack McVea in 1947.

Cover versions of the song were subsequently recorded by several other artists that same year, and the title became a popular catch-phrase.

- You can listen to a version of 'Open the Door, Richard' by Louis Jordan and His Tympany Five at Rhapsody.Com.
(follow link)
- - And as you might guess from the cartoon, in 1947, Rev. Richard R. St. John was an Associate Editor of
Extension Magazine.

▼ ADDENDA, 4.18.09: Another 'secular' WWII-era O'malley panel found, not in the pages of Extension, but from the Sept. 29, 1945 issue of The Saturday Evening Post.

1 comment:

mel said...

About 50 years ago I saw a priceless cartoon depicting a group of monks, sitting on the floor in a circle with a phonograph in the center playing a record - the monks listening, entranced. Per the caption, one of the monks asked, "Who's on clavichord?"

I wish I could find it again.

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