Monday, October 20, 2008

Linger Over Nescafé: 1956 print ad

It's not just me, right?

Nothing outrageous, but you see it too, right?

Odd perspective, featureless yellow void.

A rugged husband whose look of appreciation or relief at achieving 'coffee hunger' satisfaction looks just slightly unhealthy.

Is it merely a 'warm, good-to-be-alive feeling'?

His eyes are fixed firmly on the coffee pouring, not at all on the woman (his wife, yes?) standing outside the frame.

The kid in the background is so disconnected from the foreground that he may as well be reading his Sunday morning funnies on another planet.

What happened on Saturday night?

3 comments:

John M. said...

~shiver~

That guy looks like a fusion of Bill Pullman and Kirk Douglas.... on acid.

DJWildBill said...

Take a closer look at the stream of pouring coffee, the coffee pouring into the cup, the coffee pot's glass bowl, and at the coffee pot's upper rim. Here you'll find subliminal advertising at its best (worst) with hidden text and images your eye wasn't really meant to see but which your brain will register as sexually stimulating or arousing or desirous.

Look closely and you'll see this type of hidden imagery in ads running from the 30's through today in print media but this is an excellent example from 1956.

What? You can't quite make it out?

A few things to look at: the coffee pot has a vaginal imprint on the bowl, the word "SEX" is hidden in the cup and under the steam, there are naked girls writhing in the stream of pouring coffee, and the rim of the pot is lined with phallic symbols and the word "SEX" again.

Still don't see it with your eyes? Don't worry, your mind does and you suddenly would like to buy some coffee. In fact, it would now be more "satisfying" than if you hadn't seen the image. Try enlarging the image in a graphics program to get a closer look. You'll be surprised at the tricks Madison Avenue played on you, the general and unsuspecting public. Larry Tate and Darrin Stevens didn't tell you half the story...

Other routine examples of subliminal advertising from the period with even more hidden images and text are in the liquor and cigarette ads. They virtually all contained hidden phallic symbols, breast, and suggestive hidden text.

Hop this helps tell you why the man is not looking at his wife...

Preston said...

Is it me or does dad have that "fake orange spray on" tan look?

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