Showing posts with label gallery. Show all posts
Showing posts with label gallery. Show all posts

Monday, July 6, 2009

What's a few more old dusty Men's magazines between friends? (flickr link)

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I've added just a few more old girlie mag cover scans to a big batch that I posted at Flickr almost a year ago...

- Please follow this link to my flickr set:
A 'Cover Gallery' of 1950s and '60s
Men's Magazines
!
(50 images)

These late 1950s cover images allow the predominantly late '60s set to skew just a little earlier.

It's fun to see the relatively subtle (and tasteful) designs and color palette in the earlier covers give way to the kooky kraziness of the
High Sixties...

...Enjoy!


































































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-

Follow this link to my flickr set:
A 'Cover Gallery' of 1950s and '60s Men's Magazines
!
(50 images)

Monday, September 22, 2008

Bill O'Malley cartoons from Extension Magazine (1946 - '47)

I found these cartoons in a few old copies of Extension Magazine, 'the Catholic Saturday Evening Post', that I came across recently.

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Bill O'Malley was a prolific cartoonist, producing a lot of work for many American magazines from the 1940's through the 1960's.

I've seen several of the old paperbacks collecting
Bill O'Malley's 'Two Little Nuns' series of cartoons, but personally I don't recall seeing his more 'secular' work - - or even panels that didn't feature the nuns.

You can learn more and see a few more examples of O'Malley's artwork at Christopher Wheeler's Cartoon(ist) Gallery,
and another small example at Mike Gray, Pencil For Hire.




(For the puzzled, I'll venture this 1946 cartoon ▲ refers to leaving behind military service, post WWII)






























































































































- Again, for any who might be puzzled by the reference;
'Open the Door, Richard' was a popular R&B song (derived from an old vaudeville routine) first recorded by
Jack McVea in 1947.

Cover versions of the song were subsequently recorded by several other artists that same year, and the title became a popular catch-phrase.

- You can listen to a version of 'Open the Door, Richard' by Louis Jordan and His Tympany Five at Rhapsody.Com.
(follow link)
- - And as you might guess from the cartoon, in 1947, Rev. Richard R. St. John was an Associate Editor of
Extension Magazine.

▼ ADDENDA, 4.18.09: Another 'secular' WWII-era O'malley panel found, not in the pages of Extension, but from the Sept. 29, 1945 issue of The Saturday Evening Post.

Tuesday, September 9, 2008

Excerpts from Elson-Gray's Primer & Book One Readers, 1930 editions (flickr link)





Please follow this link to my flickr set:
'Excerpts from Elson-Gray's Primer & Book One Readers, 1930 editions'

(54 images)

I've posted some images from the first set of beginning reader textbooks that introduced the characters 'Dick and Jane', who - - for better or worse
- - would influence a generation.

Basal readers like the Elson-Gray series were considered 'state-of-the-art' educational tools once upon a time, and they received wide use in American schools for several decades.

Eventually their typical neglect of phonics, coupled with an unnatural narrative structure would turn popular opinion, and they were deemed to be an inferior method for teaching reading skills.



Flawed? Perhaps...
...Clichéd over time?
Most definitely - - but nevertheless, the scenario and structure propagated by
William H. Elson and
William S. Gray became an archetype.

There's a dearth of info available about the various illustrators for these 1930 editions.
Anything you can share on that subject is much appreciated. Please leave a comment or drop an e-mail.

Please follow this link to my flickr set:
'Excerpts from Elson-Gray's Primer & Book One Readers, 1930 editions'
(54 images)












Monday, July 28, 2008

Cover Gallery: 1950s and '60s Men's Magazines (flickr link)

- Please follow this link to my flickr set:
A 'Cover Gallery' of 1950s and '60s Men's Magazines
!
(50 images)

The images there may be considered Not Safe For Work, but they're so very tame as compared with today's standards.

What's not tame are the garish colors, the bold graphic design, the saucy & silly titles and lurid cover blurbs of another era.

- - The cover girls are of another era, too.

Dating from 1957 - 1969, with the bulk of them falling around 1967, the mags in this batch are seldom classy, sometimes seedy, but always an eyeful.
Check 'em out!





































- Please follow this link to my flickr set: A 'Cover Gallery' of 1950s and '60s Men's Magazines!
(50 images)

Monday, March 24, 2008

Comics Artist Dave Stevens passed away?!?!

I've recently returned from a trek out of town and away from many of my routine information sources.

It was with no small sadness and some surprise that I've just learned of the passing of illustrator Dave Stevens.

He lost a long battle with leukemia, passing away on Monday, March 10th, 2008 at the age of merely 52.

Along with many other comics readers, I first discovered Dave Stevens' artwork during the big independent publishing boom of the early 1980's, and just like many other fans, I was immediately hooked and hungry for more examples of his art.

Serialized installments of The Rocketeer were of course the main treat. A huge breath of fresh air and a reminder that comics could be just plain fun. (My own well-timed introduction to Bettie Page, too!)

If his comics were few and far between in those years, it was understood that they were worth the wait.

Cover art by Dave Stevens seemed to come around a bit more often during the first hunk of the '80's.

Here's a few examples dug out of my collection...

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For more on Dave Stevens and his artistic legacy, see also:
- Biography / career overview at The Comics Reporter

- Stevens page at Lambiek

- Remembrances at Mark Evanier's 'News From Me' (scroll down the page), and at The Beat

- Excerpts from a 2001 interview with Dave Stevens, from Comic Book Artist #15

- An archived forum at Newsarama, with some included scans of more of Stevens' artwork

Tuesday, March 4, 2008

Rock N' Roll 'Collage Drawings' by Opal Louis Nations, 1980 - '81

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He'd worn many hats prior to leaving his native Britain, but when I first encountered
Opal Louis Nations, he was relatively new to the SF bay area, and had recently begun hosting a wonderful late-night doo-wop show on community radio in Berkeley.

He also made fascinating and beautifully playful pieces of artwork celebrating the early days of Rock & Roll music. They could be sentimental, whimsical, scandalous and odd, and I loved them. Still do.

Many of these images appeared in a book of his work, 'The Nations of Rock N' Roll'.

In recent years, Nations has curated and produced many wonderful CD collections of vintage Gospel recordings, and has written several articles for Blues & Rhythm Magazine.

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Freshly-stirred links